October | 2017 | Paperless Cockpit

Monthly Archives: October 2017

How to pre-flight your iPad in less than 5 minutes


By Bret Koebbe The iPad is now standard equipment for most pilots' flying, whether as a primary reference for digital charts or as a performance calculator. Something that important demands a quick pre-flight... ... Read more here:: How to pre-flight your iPad in less than 5 minutes… Read more ...

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FAA and EASA Update Aviation Safety Agreement


October 19 Safety in todays global aviation market depends to a great extent on international partnerships between aviation regulators. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) fully subscribes to this philosophy, which is why on September 22 the agency updated its long-standing aviation safety agreement with the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) The changes in this agreement enhance the risk-based approach to safety by optimizing reliance on each authoritys expertise in aircraft certification through Revision 6 of the Technical Implementation Procedures (TIP). The revision will go into effect six months from the signing date of September 22, 2017. Typically, the FAA and EASA do not completely duplicate each others certification of aircraft products, instead each entity performs a validation of certification activities. The new TIP revision will permit increased acceptance of approvals without technical involvement by the authority conducting the validation. In certain cases, the revised TIP also will allow a streamlined validation process to expedite issuance of a type certificate without technical review. These changes give both the FAA and EASA the opportunity to have even greater reliance on the regulatory capabilities and the technical competencies of one anothers aircraft certification systems. When technical involvement is necessary to validate a product, a work plan will now be required to define the extent of the validating authoritys involvement. This provides a structured approach using program management principles to ensure accountability to the bilateral agreement. Revision 6 of the TIP contributes directly to the FAAs overall vision of global leadership by promoting international partnerships to reduce barriers and leads the advancement of aviation safety across geopolitical boundaries. Read more here:: FAA and EASA Update Aviation Safety Agreement… Read more ...

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Fly Safe: Prevent Loss of Control


October 19The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the general aviation (GA) communitys national #FlySafe campaign is designed to educate GA pilots about the best practices to calculate and predict aircraft performance and to operate within established aircraft limitations. Surviving a CrashEvery pilot needs to prepare for the unexpected. Although surviving a crash is one of those I hope it never happens events, its something you need to consider both for yourself, and your passengers. If something happens, your passengers will look to you for leadership and survival. This edition of FlySafe offers a few important survival tips, but the FAA recommends supplementing this information with the appropriate training and preparation. A number of courses are available, including a one-day, post-crash survival course tailored for GA pilots offered by the FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI). This course, and others like it, are designed to introduce you to the knowledge and skills you need to cope with various common survival scenarios. This course also teaches students how to assemble and use a personal survival kit. Were On the GroundWhat Next?!The unexpected happened, and you were forced to put your plane down. You survived!! Your passengers appear to be ok, too. Do you know what to do next? A common acronym that can help is STOP. Stop. Think. Observe. Plan. Stop: Your adrenaline is flowing. Once you and your passengers are safely away from the aircraft, try to calm down. Avoid panicking. Think: Prioritize your next moves. First, are there any life-threatening injuries? What resources do you have for first aid? Can you signal for help? Observe: You need shelter to survive, so start surveying your surroundings. Do you have food or water available? Can you start a fire? Do you know how much time there is before nightfall? Plan: Conserve your energy.… Read more ...

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Opinion: NBAA 2017—Flat Is The New Up


Nothing extraordinary is expected heading into 2018, but the status of the business jet industry looks a lot better than it has for most of the last decade. read more Read more here:: Opinion: NBAA 2017—Flat Is The New Up… Read more ...

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Opinion: NBAA 2017—Flat Is The New Up


Nothing extraordinary is expected heading into 2018, but the status of the business jet industry looks a lot better than it has for most of the last decade. read more Read more here:: Opinion: NBAA 2017—Flat Is The New Up… Read more ...

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GE Gains Little By Grounding Its Corporate Jets


Optics win despite review of bottom-line benefits Details on the benefits of business aircraft departments were released near simultaneously to GE's grounding of its jets. read more Read more here:: GE Gains Little By Grounding Its Corporate Jets… Read more ...

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10 ways to use your iPad to save money on fuel


By John Zimmerman In addition to weather, today's iPad apps can also provide you with a wealth of data to assist in fuel planning. There are a lot of variables that come into play here, including winds aloft, airplane... ... Read more here:: 10 ways to use your iPad to save money on fuel… Read more ...

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Top 10 aviation apps for Apple Watch


By Bret Koebbe More and more aviation app developers are starting to include Apple Watch apps along with their primary iPad/iPhone app, allowing you to access bite-size pieces of aviation data from your wrist.... ... Read more here:: Top 10 aviation apps for Apple Watch… Read more ...

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The Week In Technology, Oct. 16-20, 2017


Scaled flies Model 401; Yamaha goes multicopter; Flirtey flies defibrillators; Spike tests supersonic design; DARPA taps Aerojet for TBCC; Dubai's firefighting UAV. read more Read more here:: The Week In Technology, Oct. 16-20, 2017… Read more ...

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New Commercial Hot-Air Balloon Safety Program


October 13After a July 2016 balloon accident in Lockhart, TX that caused 16 fatalities, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) took proactive steps to increase the safety of hot-air balloon tourism. As the result of a year-long FAA Call to Action with the commercial hot-air balloon industry, the Balloon Federation of America (BFA) has developed an Envelope of Safety accreditation program for balloon ride operations. Consumers can use the program to select a ride company or pilot that strives to reach a higher safety standard a move the agency applauds. To meet the BFAs program requirements, company pilots of balloons that are capable of carrying more than 4-6 passengers must be commercially certificated for 18 months, have a specified amount of flight experience, and hold an FAA second-class medical certificate. Pilots also must pass a drug and alcohol background check, have attended a BFA-sanctioned safety seminar within the last 12 months, and be enrolled in the FAA WINGS program. The BFA will verify this information annually, and will check the safety background of pilot applicants by researching FAA accident and incident data. A second part of the program provides balloon ride operators with a choice of three levels of safety accreditation: Silver, Gold, or Platinum. While any size company can achieve the highest level, the tiered structure is designed with different size companies in mind. Each level has increasingly stringent safety requirements including: Meeting the pilot requirementsHolding valid aircraft and commercial vehicle insuranceNot exceeding a minimum specified number of accidents or incidents within a recent time periodVerifying annual aircraft inspectionsHosting a forum for passengers to rate the companyNotifying local FAA offices of the location of their base of operationsExecuting and storing passenger liability waiversConducting random pilot drug screeningDeveloping written policies for crew safety. The FAA believes the BFA program will enhance safety and professionalism, and will allow consumers to be better informed before they choose a commercial balloon ride operator.… Read more ...

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Garmin GTN avionics trainer gets big update (and it’s now free)


By Bret Koebbe Garmin offers a free training app for iPad that allows you to simulate the operation of their popular GTN 650 and 750 panel-mount navigators. Here we'll take a look at the most recent update to the... ... Read more here:: Garmin GTN avionics trainer gets big update (and it’s now free)… Read more ...

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Advanced Procedures Help Tame Mountain Approaches


Performance-based navigation and runway improvements are crucial to airline night operations at a New Zealand airport surrounded by mountains. read more Read more here:: Advanced Procedures Help Tame Mountain Approaches… Read more ...

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New Cuba Routes Effective October 12


By ForeFlight Miami ARTCC and Havana ACC have cooperated to revise the existing routes between Florida and Cuba in an effort to improve efficiency and safety. The most significant change is the removal of the G448 airway, which until now has been the primary route between Miami ARTCC and Havana ACC. Replacing it are two RNAV airways: Y442 (southbound only) and Y183 (northbound only). Accompanying these changes are modifications to overflight routes and existing Cuba SIDs and STARs. If you frequently fly this corridor or plan to in the future, we recommend you download and review the full presentation from Miami ARTCC (linked here) to familiarize yourself with the changes, which went into effect at 0400Z on October 12, 2017. Read more here:: New Cuba Routes Effective October 12… Read more ...

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New Atlanta STARs Published


By ForeFlight The FAA is publishing ten new RNAV STARs for the Atlanta Metroplex, eight for KATL and two for nearby satellite airports, to replace existing procedures. All ten of the new STARs will appear in ForeFlight as part of the October 12 chart data cycle, however, the eight KATL STARs will not become active until the 17th. Attempting to file with those procedures before the 17th will likely result in a rejection from ATC, so you should wait until after the 17th to file them as part of a flight plan. You can begin filing with the two satellite STARs on the October 12 effective date. These are the eight new KATL STARs and the existing procedures that they are replacing (the last four are our favorites): These are the two new satellite STARs and the existing procedures that they are replacing: Read more here:: New Atlanta STARs Published… Read more ...

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New Quieter Aircraft


Beginning in January 1, 2018, the FAA will require newly designed aircraft to be quieter which will help toward lowering noise around airports and surrounding communities. Called Stage 5 Airplane Noise Standards, this FAA rule ensures that the latest available noise reduction technology is incorporated into new aircraft designs. As a result, new airplane type designs in the subsonic jet airplanes and subsonic transport category large airplanes will operate at least 7 decibels (dBs) quieter than airplanes in the current fleet. The FAA is committed to reducing aircraft noise through a balanced approach through the reduction of noise at its source (i.e., the aircraft); improved land use planning around airports; and, a wider use of aircraft operating procedures and restrictions that abate noise. Reducing aircraft noise is important to the FAA because its an important quality of life issue for surrounding airport communities, said FAA Administrator Michael Huerta. We will continue to do our best through new technologies, procedures, and community engagement to make aircraft operations quieter. In 1975, there were about 200 million people flying in the United States, with about 7 million people exposed to what is considered significant aircraft noise. Since then, an FAA study conducted in 2015 showed that the number of people flying in the United States had almost quadrupled yet the number of people exposed to aircraft noise had dropped to around 340,000, or a 94% reduction in aircraft noise exposure. The FAA continues to meet its reduction in aircraft noise and other environmental aviation goals through the Continuous Lower Energy, Emissions and Noise (CLEEN)Program. CLEEN is the FAAs principal Next Generation (NextGen) environmental effort to accelerate the development of new aircraft, engine technologies, and advance sustainable alternative jet fuels. The new Stage 5 rule was published on Wednesday, Oct.4 in the Federal Register. Read more here:: New Quieter Aircraft… Read more ...

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Redefining The Runway Incursion Problem


FAA and industry take a fresh look at how to avoid runway incidents Despite mitigations deployed, the number of reported runway incursions each year has remained stubbornly steady, or some say, on the rise. Safety advocates and industry want to find out why. read more Read more here:: Redefining The Runway Incursion Problem… Read more ...

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Redefining The Runway Incursion Problem


FAA and industry take a fresh look at how to avoid runway incidents Despite mitigations deployed, the number of reported runway incursions each year has remained stubbornly steady, or some say, on the rise. Safety advocates and industry want to find out why. read more Read more here:: Redefining The Runway Incursion Problem… Read more ...

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Congress vs. Trump: Will the U.S. Aid Ukraine?


Congress may ignore Trump proposal to cut aid In this week's Washington Outlook: The Eastern European nation is rebuilding its industrial base, Pentagon acquisition chief will cede power to services, another spat about how open the skies should be, a way to form national regulations for UAS, and punch list for National Space Council. read more Read more here:: Congress vs. Trump: Will the U.S. Aid Ukraine?… Read more ...

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NBAA 2017: Slow On News, Big On Expectations


Business aviation confidence is growing, but orders and new projects are still pending The National Business Aviation Association show in Las Vegas was subdued, but behind-the-scenes activity gives reason for optimism. read more Read more here:: NBAA 2017: Slow On News, Big On Expectations… Read more ...

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New Engine Problems Plague Falcon 5X Development


Dassault's Falcon 5x development faces another delay related to problems uncovered during tests of Safran's Silvercrest engine. read more Read more here:: New Engine Problems Plague Falcon 5X Development… Read more ...

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