April | 2017 | Paperless Cockpit

Monthly Archives: April 2017

5 ways to get more out of Garmin Pilot


By John Zimmerman The more often you use an app, the more you learn about it. And so it is with Garmin Pilot, a powerful electronic flight bag app that packs in a lot of features - but only for those who know where to... ... Read more here:: 5 ways to get more out of Garmin Pilot… Read more ...

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FAA Issues Study on UAS Human Collision Hazards


April 28- What might happen if a drone hits a person on the ground? Whats the risk of serious injury? Although the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) cant yet definitively answer those questions, studies by a consortium of leading universities have made a start toward better understanding the risks of allowing small unmanned aircraft or drones to fly over people. The consortium that conducted the research includes the University of Alabama-Huntsville; Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University; Mississippi State University; and the University of Kansas, through the Alliance for System Safety of UAS through Research Excellence (ASSURE). ASSURE represents 23 of the world's leading research institutions and 100 leading industry and government partners. It began the research in September 2015. The research team reviewed techniques used to assess blunt force trauma, penetration injuries and lacerations the most significant threats to people on the ground. The team classified collision severity by identifying hazardous drone features, such as unprotected rotors. The group also reviewed more than 300 publications from the automotive industry and consumer battery market, as well as toy standards and the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) database. Finally, the team conducted crash tests, dynamic modeling, and analyses related to kinetic energy, energy transfer, and crash dynamics. When the studies were complete, personnel from NASA, the Department of Defense, FAA chief scientists, and other subject matter experts conducted a strenuous peer review of the findings. The studies identified three dominant injury types applicable to small drones: Blunt force trauma the most significant contributor to fatalitiesLacerations blade guards required for flight over peoplePenetration injuries difficult to apply consistently as a standard The research showed multi-rotor drones fall more slowly than the same mass of metal due to higher drag on the drone. Unlike most drones, wood and metal debris do not deform and transfer most of their energy to whatever they hit.… Read more ...

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Proposed UNLV Stadium Could Prove Problematic for Las Vegas-Area Operations


NBAA encourages business aviation stakeholders operating around Las Vegas, NV to weigh in on the FAA's evaluation of a proposed stadium less than a mile from McCarran International Airport (LAS). "The FAA's determination that this facility won't have an impact on existing or future approaches isn't accurate," said NBAA Access Committee member Keith Gordon. "We're building PBN approaches to Runway 19L and 19R, but those don't appear to have been considered." Read more here:: Proposed UNLV Stadium Could Prove Problematic for Las Vegas-Area Operations… Read more ...

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FAA Evaluates Drone Detection Systems at DFW


This week, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and its partners are conducting detection research on unmanned aircraft (UAS) popularly called drones at Dallas/Fort Worth International (DFW) Airport. The DFW evaluation is the latest in a series of detection system evaluations that began in February 2016. Previous evaluations took place at Atlantic City International Airport; John F. Kennedy International Airport; Eglin Air Force Base; Helsinki, Finland Airport; and Denver International Airport. Drones that enter the airspace around airports can pose serious safety threats. The FAA is coordinating with government and industry partners to evaluate technologies that could be used to detect drones in and around airports. This effort complies with congressional language directing the FAA to evaluate UAS detection systems at airports and other critical infrastructure sites. At DFW, the Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi UAS test site is performing the flight operations using multiple drones. Gryphon Sensors is the participating industry partner. The companys drone detection technologies include radar, radio frequency and electro-optical systems. The FAAs federal partners in the overall drone detection evaluation effort include the Department of Homeland Security; the Department of Defense; the Federal Bureau of Investigation; the Federal Communications Commission; Customs and Border Protection; the Department of the Interior; the Department of Energy; NASA; the Department of Justice; the Bureau of Prisons; the U.S. Secret Service; the U.S. Capitol Police; and the Department of Transportation. The work is part of the FAAs Pathfinder Program for UAS detection at airports. The FAA intends to use the information gathered during this assessment and other previous evaluations to develop minimum performance standards for any UAS detection technology that may be deployed in or around U.S. airports. These standards are expected to facilitate a consistent and safe approach to UAS detection at U.S. airports. Read more here:: FAA Evaluates Drone Detection Systems at DFW… Read more ...

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Philjets Now Largest Operator Of Airbus Helos In Philippines


PhilJets Group will be the Philippines' largest operator of Airbus helicopters, following its new order for one twin-engine H145 and two single-engine H130s. read more Read more here:: Philjets Now Largest Operator Of Airbus Helos In Philippines… Read more ...

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Fly Safe: Prevent Loss of Control Accidents


Mountain Flying: Experience and Training is Essential Mountain flying is exhilarating, exciting, and challenging. It can open up new flying opportunities, but you need training, experience, and careful preparation to safely navigate those lofty peaks and spectacular scenery. Your training should begin with a quality mountain flying course that includes adequate mountain ground and flight training. You have a narrow window of safety when flying around mountains so youll need the experience and knowledge gained from a recognized training program. After your training is complete, and before your first flight, make sure you perform a mountain checkout with a qualified mountain flight instructor. Mountain flying, even more so than flight in the flatlands, is very unforgiving of poor training and poor planning. Its essential that you learn how to carefully prepare for the rigors and potential pitfalls of a mountain flight. Knowing the conditions is essential. The combination of weather and the surrounding terrain can cause dangerous wind, severe turbulence, and other conditions that may create serious challenges for a small GA aircraft. So, its important to use every available clue about the weather and terrain. Even experienced mountain pilots may not be familiar with the way local conditions and terrain may affect an aircrafts performance. While enjoying the views at a high-density altitude, you can quickly become surprised by your aircrafts changing performance. The pressure altitude, corrected for temperature, will make your airplane perform as if it is at a higher altitude. This change can have an adverse impact on your aircrafts performance. Here are the skills youll need: Knowledge of your airplanes performance, including how your aircraft will perform in all weather conditions and at high altitudes. Youll need to review takeoff, climb, landing, cold starts, hot starts, and stalls, among other performance characteristics. Make sure you take conditions into consideration, and are leaning the engine correctly for optimum power.… Read more ...

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Three Tips for Dealing with Hailstorms


Spring is finally here, bringing with it balmy temperatures - and hail the size of baseballs. From roughly May to September, hailstorms can occur regularly in certain areas of the United States, particularly in the Great Plains, where "Hail Alley" stretches through Colorado, Nebraska and Wyoming. The best hailstorm strategy for business aircraft operators is the simplest: avoid it. But if it can't be avoided, experts urge operators to take advantage of the latest technology, collaborate with other operators on weather conditions and know what to do if your aircraft is damaged. Read more here:: Three Tips for Dealing with Hailstorms… Read more ...

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Point of Impact: American Flyers Ends Nearly 50-Year Presence at SMO


After almost 50 years and thousands of pilots trained, American Flyers is pulling up stakes at Southern California's Santa Monica Municipal Airport (SMO). Like all the other aviation businesses at SMO, American Flyers has been operating on a month-to-month lease, making it next to impossible for the flight school to attract financing for capital investments. "We've been in the flight training business for 77 years, at many airports, and at every other location they love having us there," said Jill Cole, president of American Flyers. "Unfortunately, it didn't make any sense for us to stay at Santa Monica with the city trying to do everything it could to run us off the field." Read more here:: Point of Impact: American Flyers Ends Nearly 50-Year Presence at SMO… Read more ...

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FAA publishes first set of UAS facility maps


The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) today published more than 200 facility maps to streamline the commercial drone authorization process. The maps depict areas and altitudes near airports where UAS may operate safely. But drone operators still need FAA authorization to fly in those areas. This marks a key first step as the FAA and industry work together to automate the airspace authorization process. The maps will help drone operators improve the quality of their Part 107 airspace authorization requests and help the FAA process the requests more quickly. The maps are informational and do not give people permission to fly drones. Remote pilots must still submit an online airspace authorization application. Operators may download the map data in several formats, view the site on mobile devices and customize their views. The map viewer displays numbers in grid cells which represent the distances Above Ground Level (AGL) in one square mile up to 400 feet where drones may fly. Zeros indicate areas around airports and other aircraft operating areas, like hospital helipads, where drones cannot fly. Remote pilots can refer to the maps to tailor their requests to align with locations and altitudes when they complete airspace authorization applications. This will help simplify the process and increase the likelihood that the FAA will approve their requests. FAA air traffic personnel will use the maps to process Part 107 airspace authorization requests. Altitudes that exceed those depicted on the maps require additional safety analysis and coordination to determine if an application can be approved. Additional maps will be published every 56 days through the end of the year. The updates will coincide with the agencys existing 56-day aeronautical chart production schedule. If a map is not yet available, it can be expected in future releases. The facility maps are an important accomplishment as the FAA collaborates with industry to safely integrate drones into the National Airspace System.… Read more ...

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Questions For EBAA's Brandon Mitchener


Questions for Brandon Mitchener, CEO of the European Business Aviation Association. read more Read more here:: Questions For EBAA's Brandon Mitchener… Read more ...

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Primer On Letting Employees Go: Knowing When And How To Fire


Firing an employee is one of the most unpleasant of all managerial tasks. It is emotionally draining and there is an additional administrative burden involved to ensure that laws and company policies are followed in the process. read more Read more here:: Primer On Letting Employees Go: Knowing When And How To Fire… Read more ...

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Jet-A and Avgas Fuel Prices: April 2017


Compare Jet-A and avgas fuel prices by region based on a survey conducted in April 2017 by Aviation Research Group/U.S. Inc. and an analysis of the lowest fuel prices reported by FBOs on acukwik.com. read more Read more here:: Jet-A and Avgas Fuel Prices: April 2017… Read more ...

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Selected Accidents And Incidents In March 2017


Selected Accidents and Incidents in March 2017. The following NTSB information is preliminary. read more Read more here:: Selected Accidents And Incidents In March 2017… Read more ...

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Two Chances Lost: Pilot And Mechanic Both Miss Aileron Hook-Up Error


Arguably, among the most challenging and potentially hazardous missions a pilot undertakes are post-maintenance test flights. read more Read more here:: Two Chances Lost: Pilot And Mechanic Both Miss Aileron Hook-Up Error… Read more ...

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Protesters Angry Over Executive Compensation At Bombardier


United Airlines is not the only aviation company to be confronted with public outrage recently. Angry protestors gathered outside Bombardier's Montreal headquarters recently to express their ire over the company's plan to raise the compensation of its senior executives by $32 million. As a result, on March 31, Pierre Beaudoin, the company's executive chairman, opted to forgo his extra pay—but his announcement was quickly followed by a combative statement from Bombardier's head of human resources, Jean Monty. read more Read more here:: Protesters Angry Over Executive Compensation At Bombardier… Read more ...

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Making Risk Management Matter


Making risk management matter It's up to the business aviation community to help pilots truly grasp the impact of their aeronautical decision-making. read more Read more here:: Making Risk Management Matter… Read more ...

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The Heir Apparent: Bell’s New Jet Ranger X


Aaron Smith Bell hopes to regain light-turbine glory with its new Model 505 Jet Ranger X. read more Read more here:: The Heir Apparent: Bell’s New Jet Ranger X… Read more ...

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Approach Impossible: 'Chair Flying' To Minimums Or Not At All


Much of flying is an act of faith. You are placing your trust in those who designed and built the aircraft, in those who maintain it and in those who trained you to defy gravity for a living. read more Read more here:: Approach Impossible: 'Chair Flying' To Minimums Or Not At All… Read more ...

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How Commercial Operators Are Redefining Business Aviation Charters


If business aviation is to grow in the new economy, it has to be expanded to a larger demographic of users beyond blue-chip flight departments and high-net-worth individuals. read more Read more here:: How Commercial Operators Are Redefining Business Aviation Charters… Read more ...

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BCA Business Aviation Products And Service Previews


BCA shares news of the latest products and services for the business aviation industry. read more Read more here:: BCA Business Aviation Products And Service Previews… Read more ...

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