May | 2015 | Paperless Cockpit

Monthly Archives: May 2015

FAA and Industry Will Study Pilot Fitness


The FAA is working with the commercial aviation and medical communities to study the emotional and mental health of U.S. commercial pilots. The joint FAA and industry group known as the Commercial Aviation Safety Team (CAST) recommended the study based on the recent Malaysia Flight 370 and Germanwings Flight 9525 accidents. The Pilot Fitness Aviation Rulemaking Committee (ARC) will provide the FAA with recommendations within six months. The group will include U.S. and international government and industry aviation experts, including a working group of medical professionals who specialize in aerospace medicine. U.S. pilots undergo robust medical screening, but recent accidents in other parts of the world prompted the FAA to take a new look at the important issue of pilot fitness. The ARC will examine issues including the awareness and reporting of emotional and mental health issues, the methods used to evaluate pilot emotional and mental health, and barriers to reporting such issues. Based on the groups recommendations, the FAA may consider changes to medical methods, aircraft design, policies and procedures, pilot training and testing, training for Aerospace Medical Examiners, or potential actions that may be taken by professional, airline, or union groups. The ARCs meetings will not be open to the public. Federal Aviation Regulations outline the medical requirements for pilots. U.S airline pilots undergo a medical exam with an FAA-approved physician every six or twelve months depending on the pilot's age. Read more here:: FAA and Industry Will Study Pilot Fitness… Read more ...

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FAA Streamlines COAs for UAS Test Sites


The Federal Aviation Administration has made it simpler for the six unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) test sites to conduct research by giving them blanket authorizations to fly public aircraft operations throughout the National Airspace System at or below 200 feet. The FAA expects this improved access for the test sites will provide more opportunities for research that may help the agency integrate UAS into the nations airspace more quickly and easily. The new Certificates of Waiver or Authorization (COAs) allow small UAS (under 55 lbs.) operated by the test sites to fly up to 200 feet above ground level anywhere in the country except restricted airspace and areas close to airports and heliports. Operators must fly during daytime Visual Flight Rules conditions and within visual line of sight of the pilot. The new authorizations also let the test sites fly various types of UAS under a single COA, making it easier for them to conduct research missions. Previously, the FAA required authorization for each type of UAS the operators wanted to fly. The FAA now permits people who hold a recreational or sport pilot certificate to conduct test site operations under the blanket COA. Previously, the agency required operators to hold at least a private pilot certificate. A third class medical certificate also is no longer required. Now an operator only needs a valid drivers license to satisfy the medical requirement. These expanded operational parameters for the test sites are similar to those the FAA implemented recently for civil UAS operations authorized under a Section 333 exemption. (http://www.faa.gov/news/updates/?newsId=82245) The six UAS test sites are the first public operators to receive this type of blanket airspace access across the United States, including Alaska and Hawaii. The sites may still fly outside the blanket COA parameters if they receive or retain separate COAs specific to the airspace requested for those operations.… Read more ...

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NextGen's Next Big Thing


May 21- As we move into the summer thunderstorm season, NextGen technology is helping to keep departing airplanes on schedule as they fly out of Newark, NJ, into some of the busiest and most congested airspace in the U.S. That is welcome news for airline passengers who will be traveling during the busy summer vacation months. FedEx, United Airlines and UPS have been participating in trials with the FAA in Newark and Memphis to demonstrate Data Communications (Data Comm) capabilities and benefits. Data Comm is an FAA NextGen technology that revolutionizes communications between air traffic controllers and pilots.Data Comm provides additional advanced capabilities for controller-to-pilot communications using digital information exchange. By exchanging digital messages in addition to talking to each other over the radio, air traffic controllers, pilots, and airline operations centers can communicate more clearly and efficiently. Better communication improves controller and pilot productivity, which enhances airspace capacity and reduces flight delays. It also helps aircraft fly more direct routes, saving time and fuel, reduces the impact on the environment, and improves safety. Air traffic controllers currently use radio voice communications to give clearances and other flight information to pilots, which is time-consuming and restrictive.Data Comm provides a two-way data exchange between controllers and flight crews for clearances, instructions, advisories, flight crew requests and reports. It enhances air traffic safety by allowing controllers to give more timely and effective clearances. FedEx, United Airlines, and UPS already are seeing reduced delays and cost savings as a result of Data Comm benefits. They achieved those benefits because of reduced communication time between controllers and pilots, as well as improved re-routing around weather and congestion, which all translate to time saved for the flying public. The FAA plans to deploy Data Comm in more than 50 air traffic control towers beginning in 2015 and in air traffic control facilities that manage high altitude traffic beginning in 2019.… Read more ...

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FAA Expands "Lessons Learned" Safety Website


May 21- The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) recently added six new accident modules to the agencys one-of-a-kind Lessons Learned online and publicly available safety library. The library captures valuable information learned from some of the worlds most historically significant accidents. New modules include: 1960: Capital Airlines Viscount (Turbine Engine Icing, Engine Isolation)1995: Atlantic Southeast EMB-120 (Structural Inspection, Propeller Blade Failure)1996: Birgenair B757 (Avionics Confusion, Cockpit Resource Management)1997: Fine Air DC-8 (Cargo Loading, Organizational Safety Oversight)2000: Air France Concorde (Fuel Tank Structural Integrity, Minor Repair Processes)2008: British Airways B777 (Fuel System Icing, Engine Isolation) The library's collection now totals 76 modules, with almost 20,000 subscribers. The initiative began with the release of 10 modules just six years ago. Each module relies heavily on multimedia as a means to educate and engage the aviation community. Creative combinations of videos, animations, and photographs make the information easy to follow and understand in just 30 minutes, even for an aviation novice. Learning from the past can help keep future accidents from occurring under similar circumstances or for similar reasons. Lessons learned modules cover a wide range of operational, maintenance, and design issues, and go through months of vetting by FAA employees, aviation industry experts and other international regulatory authorities. This coordination ensures the content is accurate, complete and internationally relevant. You can research the Lessons Learned library at: http://lessonslearned.faa.gov/ Read more here:: FAA Expands "Lessons Learned" Safety Website… Read more ...

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Flight Outfitters launches new line of iPad bags


By John Zimmerman A new company showed up at Sun ‘n Fun this year, promoting a pair of clean sheet flight bag designs made specifically for pilots flying with the iPad. Flight Outfitters, a functional bag... ... Read more here:: Flight Outfitters launches new line of iPad bags… Read more ...

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Regulators, Market To Determine Fate Of Synthetic Vision Guidance Systems


Uncertainty dogs next-generation synthetic vision systems OEMs and avionics companies are turning to their customers to make the case for next-generation synthetic vision systems approval. read more Read more here:: Regulators, Market To Determine Fate Of Synthetic Vision Guidance Systems… Read more ...

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Mason Holland Creates Eclipse Aerospace And Plans Expansion


Will two as one succeed? Eclipse Aerospace joins with Kestrel, a single-engine turboprop under development, forming ONE Aviation. read more Read more here:: Mason Holland Creates Eclipse Aerospace And Plans Expansion… Read more ...

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Cirrus Begins Assembly Of First Production SF50 Vision


Cirrus closes in on personal-jet finish line after 10-year stretch Rejuvenated by new financing from China, Cirrus Aircraft has certification in sight for its long-awaited single-engine personal jet. read more Read more here:: Cirrus Begins Assembly Of First Production SF50 Vision… Read more ...

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VistaJet Moves to All Large-Cabin Fleet; Turns in Record 2014


VistaJet has said farewell to it last Learjet, as it moved to an all-Bombardier Challenger and Global business jet fleet. The company has operated 20 Learjets since 2004. Since then, the Learjet fleet has made 18,262 flights, logged 42,962 flight hours and carried 28,685 passengers. Founder and Chairman Thomas Flohr bought the first Learjet, a Learjet 60 for personal use, in December 2003. That became the catalyst for the company, which operates the largest privately owned Bombardier business jet fleet of more than 45 large-cabin Global and Challenger aircraft. read more Read more here:: VistaJet Moves to All Large-Cabin Fleet; Turns in Record 2014… Read more ...

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JetTech Expands Offerings


Dassault plans to roll its first Falcon 5X s.n. 1 through the doors at its Bordeaux production facility early next month, with first flight expected not long thereafter. The aircraft, also powered by 11,450-lb. thrust Snecma Silvercrest turbofans will eventually be joined by two other 5X in the flight test program. A large aircraft, stretching 82.6 ft. from nosecone to tail, and rising 24.5 ft. from ground level to the top of its fin, its flat floor cabin is 78 in. high, 86 in. wide and nearly 40 ft. long from cockpit bulkhead to the rear of the lav. read more Read more here:: JetTech Expands Offerings… Read more ...

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Emerging Aircraft: Gulfstream G500 and G600


Gulfstream's 5,000-nm G500 and the 6,200-nm G600, unveiled with great showmanship last October, are well along in their development cycles with more than 1,800 hr. of wind-tunnel work completed. First flight of the $43.5 million G500 is to take place this year, with certification targeted for 2017 and entry into service the following year. The $54.5 million G600 is to trail by about a year. The G500 is powered by two 15,144-lb. read more Read more here:: Emerging Aircraft: Gulfstream G500 and G600… Read more ...

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Emerging Aircraft: Global 7000/8000


Despite the challenges confronting Bombardier, the Montreal planemaker says development of its top-of-the-line Global 7000 /8000 business jet program “is making good progress — including the manufacture and assembly of flight test vehicle one — as we continue to prioritize our efforts in preparation for the flight test program.” Considering that the aircraft has yet to roll out and that it can take 15 months, or much, much longer, to advance from first flight to certification award, program managers might consider turning up th read more Read more here:: Emerging Aircraft: Global 7000/8000… Read more ...

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Emerging Aircraft: Dassault Falcon 5X


Dassault plans to roll its first Falcon 5X s.n. 1 through the doors at its Bordeaux production facility early next month, with first flight expected not long thereafter. The aircraft, also powered by 11,450-lb. thrust Snecma Silvercrest turbofans will eventually be joined by two other 5X in the flight test program. A large aircraft, stretching 82.6 ft. from nosecone to tail, and rising 24.5 ft. from ground level to the top of its fin, its flat floor cabin is 78 in. high, 86 in. wide and nearly 40 ft. long from cockpit bulkhead to the rear of the lav. read more Read more here:: Emerging Aircraft: Dassault Falcon 5X… Read more ...

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Emerging Aircraft: Cessna Citation Longitude


With the midsize Citation Latitude nearing the end of its flight test program, the new Citation Longitude super-midsize jet program is ramping up significantly with teams working on the project. “We think we know what the configuration of the aircraft is based on a lot of work with customers and where we are,” Textron Chairman & CEO Scott Donnelly said early this year. “So you'll see that really start ramping up . . . read more Read more here:: Emerging Aircraft: Cessna Citation Longitude… Read more ...

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Emerging Aircraft: Bell Model 505 Jet Ranger X


​Bell Helicopter's Model 505 Jet Ranger X is making good headway — in both development and the marketplace. The helicopter began its flight trials at its Mirabel, Quebec manufacturing site last November, the same month that China's Reignwood Investment, Ltd., signed for 50 of the light singles. The aircraft features a Garmin G1000H integrated flight deck and is powered by a Turbomeca Arrius 2R turboshaft engine rated at 504 shp (takeoff) and 457 shp (max continuous) and fitted with a dual channel FADEC. read more Read more here:: Emerging Aircraft: Bell Model 505 Jet Ranger X… Read more ...

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Emerging Aircraft: AW609


AgustaWestland's third prototype AW609 civil tiltrotor is expected to take to the air this month and after completing several proving flights be dismantled and sent to Philadelphia for reassembly. It is then to undergo icing tests in Minnesota late this year. The Italian manufacturer says it has managed to increase range of the aircraft to 730 nm and is developing auxiliary underwing fuel tanks that could up that to 1,100 nm — increases that make it “an ideal transportation solution for offshore travel,” according to AgustaWestland. read more Read more here:: Emerging Aircraft: AW609… Read more ...

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Duncan Aviation Expands Non-Destructive Testing to Helicopter Operations


Duncan Aviation, based in Lincoln, Nebraska, has expanded its non-destructive testing services to helicopter operators. It has provided NDT services to business aircraft for more than 20 years. Helicopter operators can remove and send components to Duncan Aviation, along with the appropriate maintenance manuals and documentation, for any required NDT testing. It provides eddy current, florescent penetrant, ultrasonic and magnetic and particle inspections on all makes and model aircraft. Read more here:: Duncan Aviation Expands Non-Destructive Testing to Helicopter Operations… Read more ...

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Business Aviation Users Feel More Productive on Private Jets


Dassault plans to roll its first Falcon 5X s.n. 1 through the doors at its Bordeaux production facility early next month, with first flight expected not long thereafter. The aircraft, also powered by 11,450-lb. thrust Snecma Silvercrest turbofans will eventually be joined by two other 5X in the flight test program. A large aircraft, stretching 82.6 ft. from nosecone to tail, and rising 24.5 ft. from ground level to the top of its fin, its flat floor cabin is 78 in. high, 86 in. wide and nearly 40 ft. long from cockpit bulkhead to the rear of the lav. read more Read more here:: Business Aviation Users Feel More Productive on Private Jets… Read more ...

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Questions for Steve Charbonneau


Steve Charbonneau Chairman, NBAA Safety Committee; Senior Manager, Aviation Training and Standards, Altria Client Services Inc., Richmond, Virginia read more Read more here:: Questions for Steve Charbonneau… Read more ...

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Pushing the Modeling Envelope at WSI


Of all the weather phenomena with which pilots must contend, that old nemesis, the thunderstorm, remains the most feared. And for good reason. read more Read more here:: Pushing the Modeling Envelope at WSI… Read more ...

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