January | 2015 | Paperless Cockpit

Monthly Archives: January 2015

New Bad Elf GPS app available


By Bret Koebbe Bad Elf was the first company to produce portable GPS receivers for iPad, and a new Bad Elf companion app helps you get even more out these high-performance devices. ... Read more here:: New Bad Elf GPS app available… Read more ...

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Automated Reports of Blowing Snow in a Blizzard


By Scott Dennstaedt In a bona fide blizzard you would certainly expect to see a fair amount of blowing snow, right? Well, take a look at the conditions for these three airports at the height of the nor'easter that recently pummeled the Northeast with a record snowfall. KEWB 270539Z AUTO 03030G46KT 1/4SM R05/1600V2200FT +SN FZFG SQ VV004 M02/M02 A2958 RMK AO2 PK WND 03046/0538 P0000 T10171022 KTAN 270552Z AUTO 01018G32KT 1/4SM +SN FZFG VV003 M02/M03 A2962 RMK AO2 PK WND 04040/0536 SLP031 KFMH 270535Z AUTO 03032G52KT 1/4SM SN OVC002 M01/M02 A2955 RMK A02 In the belly of this storm, these airports observed strong, gusty winds, moderate to heavy snow and even a squall, but no hint of blowing snow (coded as BLSN) in any of these automated reports. This seems rather odd, but an Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) is not designed to report blowing snow in the middle of a blizzard. You read that right; it's designed to report blowing snow only after the winter storm has departed as seen here for the observation at Worcester, Massachusetts the following morning. KORH 280947Z AUTO 31020G26KT 2 1/2SM BLSN CLR M14/M18 A2972 RMK AO2 PK WND 29028/0913 VIS 3/4V5 T11391178 Before an ASOS can report blowing snow (even when blowing snow conditions are detected by the precipitation sensors), all of the following conditions must also be met – Visibility must be less than 7 statute miles Ambient temperature must be less than or equal to 14 degrees Fahrenheit Sky cover must be less than overcast or the ceiling height must be greater than 10,000 feet Wind speed must be greater than 22 knots. From the surface observations during the recent blizzard, only two of the four conditions were met, namely, wind speed and visibility. As a result, BLSN wasn't reported in the automated observation.… Read more ...

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How NextGen is Getting Fans to the Super Bowl


January 29Football fans flying to Phoenix for the Super Bowl on Feb. 1 might not realize it, but their aircraft will be taking more direct routes, saving time and fuel, and reducing carbon emissions, thanks to NextGen technologies and procedures that are delivering benefits throughout the country. 12th Man fans of the Seattle Seahawks, noted for making CenturyLink Field one of the loudest in the NFL, will find that flying out of Seattle-Tacoma International Airport is a considerably quieter experience due to the Greener Skies Over Seattle initiative, a collaborative project between the FAA, the airlines, the Port of Seattle and Boeing. The legion clad in college navy, wolf grey and most distinctively action green will ascend in aircraft using a smooth, satellite-based Area Navigation (RNAV) departure route before settling at high altitude into whats called a Q Route, a heavily traveled highway in the sky. Using NextGen technologies, the FAA has safely expanded that highway from one lane to as many as four. The Greener Skies initiative is expected to cut fuel consumption for airlines serving Seattle by 2.1 million gallons annually and reduce carbon emissions by 22,000 metric tons the equivalent of taking 4,100 cars off the road every year. Raucous New England Patriot fans escaping this weeks severe winter storm clad in nautical blue, red, new-century silver and white will have similarly quieter, smoother ascents out of Boston Logan International Airport, thanks to one of the many RNAV routes in place over the Boston metropolitan region. At cruising altitude, their dreams of victory will take place on one of the Q Routes out of the Northeast. On approach to Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, fans of both teams will be taking an Optimized Profile Descent (OPD). Just one of these descents called Eagle a large raptor coincidentally similar to a Seahawk saves 70 gallons per flight and a total of 945 minutes for all flights that use that particular approach during the course of a day.… Read more ...

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Blowing Snow or Not?


By Scott Dennstaedt In a bona fide blizzard you'd expect to see a fair amount of blowing snow, right? Well, take a look at the conditions for these three airports at the height of the nor'easter that recently pummeled New England with a record snowfall. KEWB 270539Z AUTO 03030G46KT 1/4SM R05/1600V2200FT +SN FZFG SQ VV004 M02/M02 A2958 RMK AO2 PK WND 03046/0538 P0000 T10171022 KTAN 270552Z AUTO 01018G32KT 1/4SM +SN FZFG VV003 M02/M03 A2962 RMK AO2 PK WND 04040/0536 SLP031 KFMH 270535Z AUTO 03032G52KT 1/4SM SN OVC002 M01/M02 A2955 RMK A02 Strong, gusty winds, moderate to heavy snow and even a squall is reported, but no indication of blowing snow (coded as BLSN). This seems rather odd, but an Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) is not designed to report blowing snow in the middle of a blizzard. You read that right; it's designed to only report blowing snow once the winter storm has departed such as it was in Worcester, Massachusetts the following morning. KORH 280947Z AUTO 31020G26KT 2 1/2SM BLSN CLR M14/M18 A2972 RMK AO2 PK WND 29028/0913 VIS 3/4V5 T11391178 Before an ASOS can report blowing snow (even when blowing snow conditions are detected by the precipitation sensors), all of the following conditions must also be met – Visibility must be less than 7 statute miles Ambient temperature must be less than or equal to 14 degrees Fahrenheit Sky cover must be less than overcast or the ceiling height must be greater than 10,000 feet Wind speed must be greater than 22 knots. From the surface observations during the blizzard, only two of the four conditions were met. As a result, BLSN wasn't reported in the automated observation. Keep in mind, at airports or stations with a human observer, the observation may be augmented to include BLSN like it was here for Providence, Rhode Island.… Read more ...

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Unmanned Aircraft and NFL Football Don't Mix


January 28Many familiar sounds are associated with the Super Bowl: Cheering fans. Referee whistles. The spectacular halftime show. Booming fireworks. But one sound you shouldnt hear is the whirring of an unmanned aircraft overhead. The Super Bowl is strictly a No Drone Zone. The FAA bars unauthorized aircraft including drones from flying over or near NFL regular- and post-season football games. The same restriction applies to NCAA college games in stadiums seating 30,000 or more fans, Major League Baseball games and many NASCAR events. The FAA Notice to Airmen makes it crystal clear that anyone violating the rules may be intercepted, detained and interviewed by law enforcement or security personnel. Besides possibly landing a violator in jail, flying an unmanned aircraft over a crowded stadium could result in an FAA civil penalty for careless and reckless operation of an aircraft. Bottom line: If you want to see video of the Big Game, watch it on TV. Leave your drone at home. FAA Fact SheetFAA VideoKnowBeforeYouFly website Read more here:: Unmanned Aircraft and NFL Football Don't Mix… Read more ...

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ForeFlight becomes a data creator


By John Zimmerman In the early days of aviation apps (you know, way back in 2012), developers pushed to add features. Nobody at ForeFlight or Garmin is taking a vacation, but over the last 12 months most of the major... ... Read more here:: ForeFlight becomes a data creator… Read more ...

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NBAA Exhibitor Update, #15-01


Exhibit at Asiaâ??s Biggest Business Aviation Event of the Year: ABACE2015 Reserve Your Company's EBACE2015 Exhibit Space Today Advertise in 2015 ABACE, EBACE Show Guides Read more here:: NBAA Exhibitor Update, #15-01… Read more ...

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Bombardier Learjet 85: Window of Opportunity Slams Shut


It appears the most ambitious Lear model ever is lapsing into a deep coma. read more Read more here:: Bombardier Learjet 85: Window of Opportunity Slams Shut… Read more ...

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Bombardier Learjet 85


The window of opportunity slams shut In mid-January, Bombardier announced a “pause” for an “indeterminate period” in the Learjet 85 program, interpreted by some market analysts as permanently shelving the project. In light of Montreal's taking a pre-tax special $1.4 billion write down that represents nearly 90 percent of development costs, as well as announcing a cut of 1,000 jobs at company facilities in Wichita, Kan., and Queretaro, Mexico, it appears the most ambitious Lear model ever is lapsing into a deep coma. read more Read more here:: Bombardier Learjet 85… Read more ...

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Hand-Picked Stories from the Jan. 26 Issue of The Weekly of Business Aviation


General Aviation Rushes for Super Bowl XLIX; Textron to Buy Wichita Site of UTC Aerospace Systems Eight Phoenix-area airports are expected to feel the impact of Super Bowl XLIX. Textron Aviation has agreed to buy the assets of the UTC Aerospace Systems facility in Wichita. read more Read more here:: Hand-Picked Stories from the Jan. 26 Issue of The Weekly of Business Aviation… Read more ...

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Does the iPad have a “real GPS” in it?


By John Zimmerman Four years after the first iPad shipped, lots of people are still confused about whether the game-changing tablet actually has a GPS in it. And if it does have a GPS, is it a "real" one? Let's bust... ... Read more here:: Does the iPad have a “real GPS” in it?… Read more ...

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NBAA Update, #15-04


NBAA Concerns Reflected In FAA's New Sleep Apnea Policy NBAA Welcomes New Senate, House GA Caucus Leaders NBAA, AOPA Support FAA in Effort to Deny Appeal to Curtail Operations at Santa Monica Airport Read more here:: NBAA Update, #15-04… Read more ...

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NBAA Concerns Reflected In FAA's New Sleep Apnea Policy


NBAA said that new guidance from the FAA on its once-controversial plan for testing pilots for obstructive sleep apnea now reflects a practical approach from the Association and other GA groups for addressing the condition. Read more here:: NBAA Concerns Reflected In FAA's New Sleep Apnea Policy… Read more ...

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FlexSys-Built Morphing Flap Tested To Higher Deflections


NASA is increasing flap angles in compliant trailing-edge flight tests NASA is taking no chances with flight tests of a full-scale flexible flap designed to demonstrate the potential noise and drag benefits of a seamless, morphing structure. read more Read more here:: FlexSys-Built Morphing Flap Tested To Higher Deflections… Read more ...

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Questions Loom Over Bombardier Financials, Management


Amid concerns about liquidity and CSeries progress, Bombardier announces delay in Learjet 85 program. read more Read more here:: Questions Loom Over Bombardier Financials, Management… Read more ...

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NBAA Joins 'Know Before You Fly' Initiative, Expands UAS Resources for Members


NBAA recently joined with other aviation advocacy groups and industry partners in support of the â??Know Before You Flyâ?? educational initiative to provide prospective users with the information and guidance they need to fly small unmanned aircraft systems (s-UAS) safely and responsibly. Read more here:: NBAA Joins 'Know Before You Fly' Initiative, Expands UAS Resources for Members… Read more ...

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Flight Training with the iPad webinar video now available


By Bret Koebbe Sporty's Academy and iPad Pilot News recently presented a webinar covering a variety of topics on how to effectively use the iPad during flight training. You can watch the complete video recording of... ... Read more here:: Flight Training with the iPad webinar video now available… Read more ...

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FAA to Airlines: E-cigs in Checked Bags are Fire Risk


January 23As the popularity of e-cigarettes increases, the FAA wants airlines to ensure passengers dont put their e-cigarettes in checked baggage, when they can pose a fire hazard in the cargo compartment. The FAA today released a Safety Alert for Operators (SAFO) making U.S. air carriers aware of a recent bulletin from the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) that described several incidents associated with e-cigarettes, as well as ICAOs recommendation to ban the devices in checked baggage. ICAO is the arm of the United Nations that develops and disseminates suggested standards for the international aviation community. In several incidents both inside and outside the transportation industry, e-cigarettes have overheated or caught fire when the heating element was accidentally activated. Last August, an e-cigarette in checked baggage stowed in an airliners cargo hold caused a fire that forced an evacuation of the aircraft. The danger may be increased when users modify and rebuild their reusable e-cigarette devices and interchange original and aftermarket batteries, heating elements, and vaporizing components. The FAA SAFO recommends that operators follow the ICAO bulletin and require passengers to carry e-cigarettes and related devices solely in the aircraft cabin, where overheating or fire can be observed and handled more quickly. The agency encourages airlines to communicate this new policy to passengers as widely as possible through their websites, press releases, at ticket purchase, during the check-in process and by other established means to inform passengers about hazardous materials regulations and policies. > View the FAA SAFO > Get more information on the rules for passengers carrying hazardous materials in carry-on or checked baggage Read more here:: FAA to Airlines: E-cigs in Checked Bags are Fire Risk… Read more ...

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FAA to Issue New Guidance on Sleep Apnea


January 23The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) continually works with the aviation and medical communities to ensure that pilots are fit to fly. On March 2, the FAA will issue new medical guidance to Aviation Medical Examiners (AMEs) that incorporates industry and Congressional feedback balanced with the FAA and National Transportation Safety Boards (NTSB) safety concerns about pilots flying with Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). OSA inhibits restorative sleep. Untreated OSA always has been a disqualifying medical condition and will continue to be disqualifying. The FAA is not changing its medical standards related to OSA; however, it is revising the screening approach to help AMEs find undiagnosed and untreated OSA. The new guidance will improve safety and pilot health by reducing the burdens and disincentives that may have prevented some pilots from seeking an OSA evaluation and treatment. Pilots will be able to continue flying while they are evaluated and as they begin treatment, if needed. Pilots diagnosed with OSA may send documentation of effective treatment to the FAA to arrange for a Special Issuance medical certificate to replace the regular issuance medical certificate. Based on feedback from industry on the FAAs draft guidance, the new guidance does not rely on BMI and allows a pilot to keep flying during evaluation and treatment. The FAA plans to publish the new guidance in the FAA Guide for Aviation Medical Examiners on March 2, 2015. > See FAA Fact Sheet with detailed information on sleep apnea in aviation Read more here:: FAA to Issue New Guidance on Sleep Apnea… Read more ...

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FAA Grants Two More UAS Exemptions


January 23-The Federal Aviation Administration continues to allow expanded commercial use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) operations by granting two more regulatory exemptions, bringing the total to 16 grants. The agency gave new exemptions to AeroCine, LLC for aerial cinematography, and to Burnz Eye View, Inc. for aerial photography and inspections. Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx found that the UAS in the proposed operations do not need an FAA-issued certificate of airworthiness because they do not pose a threat to national airspace users or national security. Those findings are permitted under Section 333 of the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012. In granting the exemptions, the FAA considered the planned operating environments and required certain conditions and limitations to assure the safe operation of these UAS in the National Airspace System. For example, operations require both a pilot and observer, the pilot must have at least an FAA Private Pilot certificate and a current medical certificate, and the UAS must remain within line of sight at all times. To date, the FAA has received 295 requests for exemptions from commercial entities. > View the FAAs exemption grants >Get more information on the FAA and UAS Read more here:: FAA Grants Two More UAS Exemptions… Read more ...

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