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House ATC Privatization Bill Advances; NBAA Continues Opposition


Following a House Committee's Feb. 11 passage of controversial legislation for privatizing the nation's ATC system, NBAA President and CEO Ed Bolen said the association would remain undeterred in opposing the bill as it makes its way through the legislative process. Read more here:: House ATC Privatization Bill Advances; NBAA Continues Opposition… Read more ...

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NBAA Webinar Helps Part 135 Operators Gauge Duty and Rest Compliance


An NBAA webinar last week helped Part 135 operators better understand how to comply with regulatory crew-duty and rest-time requirements, especially under challenging operating scenarios. "You must be able to provide and prove 10 hours of rest within the 24 consecutive hours preceding a flight's planned completion time," said Alex Beringer, executive vice president at Fair Wind Air Charter and one of the speakers at the webinar. "There's a mutual responsibility between the crew and the certificate holder to make sure regulations are complied with." Read more here:: NBAA Webinar Helps Part 135 Operators Gauge Duty and Rest Compliance… Read more ...

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U.K. Air Show Organizers Wary Of Post-Shoreham Regulations


Shoreham crash review set to bring increased costs and tougher regulation for future airshows. read more Read more here:: U.K. Air Show Organizers Wary Of Post-Shoreham Regulations… Read more ...

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FAA 'ATC Corporation' Spinoff Gains Ground


Though controversial, a House plan to spin off the FAA's Air Traffic Control and Modernization into a non-profit corporation is moving ahead at full speed. read more Read more here:: FAA 'ATC Corporation' Spinoff Gains Ground… Read more ...

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FAA 'ATC Corporation' Spinoff Gains Ground


Though controversial, a House plan to spin off the FAA's Air Traffic Control and Modernization into a non-profit corporation is moving ahead at full speed. read more Read more here:: FAA 'ATC Corporation' Spinoff Gains Ground… Read more ...

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U.K. Air Show Organizers Wary Of Post-Shoreham Regulations


Shoreham crash review set to bring increased costs and tougher regulation for future airshows. read more Read more here:: U.K. Air Show Organizers Wary Of Post-Shoreham Regulations… Read more ...

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Despite Legislative Developments, NBAA Continues Supporting VA Flight-Training Benefits


NBAA has reaffirmed its support for post-9/11 GI Bill flight-training benefits, and expressed concern over legislation to limit those benefits. Last year, Rep. Brad Wenstrup (R-2-OH) proposed language, buried deep within a larger bill, that would severely limit benefits for military veterans who want to enter the aviation industry by receiving flight training. The bill was passed by the U.S. House of Representatives last week, and now moves to the Senate for consideration. In a letter sent to House leaders last week, NBAA and others expressed renewed opposition to the VA flight-training cutbacks. Read more here:: Despite Legislative Developments, NBAA Continues Supporting VA Flight-Training Benefits… Read more ...

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NBAA Provides Input to ICAO Working Group on Aircraft Emissions Standards


NBAA provided important input to an International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) committee that recently issued a recommendation for a global standard to address CO2 emissions from aircraft. ICAO is the United Nations agency that develops international civil aviation standards. The recommended standard would exempt small aircraft with a maximum takeoff mass (MTOM) below 5.7 metric tons (approximately 12,566 pounds) or propeller-driven aircraft below 8.7 metric tons (about 19,180 pounds) MTOM. "This recommended standard enables the aviation industry's continued commitment to reduce aircraft emissions by improving performance, while also supporting economic growth," said Steve Brown, NBAA's chief operating officer. Read more here:: NBAA Provides Input to ICAO Working Group on Aircraft Emissions Standards… Read more ...

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FAA to Begin Decommissioning VORs This Year


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By ForeFlight As part of the NextGen initiative to adopt a Performance Based Navigation (PBN) airway structure supported by GPS, the FAA is moving forward with plans to decommission approximately 30% of currently operating domestic VORs over the next 10 years. The VORs left behind will constitute a minimum operational network, intended to support conventional navigation in the event of a GPS outage, while not tying up resources maintaining unnecessary and underused VORs. The decommission process will take place in two phases, with the first phase lasting from 2016 to 2020, and the second phase lasting from 2021 to 2025. Although the FAA has not released specific dates for when each VOR will be decommissioned, they have provided a list of the first 35 VORs that have been approved for decommissioning, and in what phase of the project each will be removed. The removal of these VORs will have a large effect on the domestic airway structure and instrument procedures at many airports, and these changes will be reflected in the charts and data available in ForeFlight. Therefore we will continue to track this process and update you when specific dates are announced for each VOR. Read more here:: FAA to Begin Decommissioning VORs This Year… Read more ...

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Video: NBAA's Ed Bolen States Association's Opposition to H.R. 4411


This video features the opening statement provided by NBAA President and CEO Ed Bolen at a Feb. 10 hearing by the U.S. House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee regarding H.R. 4441, a bill to reauthorize the Federal Aviation Administration. The legislation, which is being pushed by most airlines, proposes the creation of a privatized air traffic control system, funded by user fees. Read more here:: Video: NBAA's Ed Bolen States Association's Opposition to H.R. 4411… Read more ...

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Opinion: The Rise Of The Special Mission Aircraft


Planners need to ride the new ISR wave Why some very important military airplanes don't look like military airplanes. read more Read more here:: Opinion: The Rise Of The Special Mission Aircraft… Read more ...

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Going Blind: Zero/Zero Landings


The practical future of all-weather landings As you begin maneuvering for the planned approach, the controller states that, due to a marine layer that has moved into the area, visibility has gone from the forecast 2 mi. to less than a quarter of a mile. You've come prepared. Thanks to the special onboard systems, this approach is authorized down to zero/zero conditions. It is flown completely by the autopilot. read more Read more here:: Going Blind: Zero/Zero Landings… Read more ...

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Bizjets Finding Front-Line Role


Air forces are turning to business jets to meet special mission needs Business jets are becoming the platform of choice for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance. read more Read more here:: Bizjets Finding Front-Line Role… Read more ...

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Opinion: The Rise Of The Special Mission Aircraft


Planners need to ride the new ISR wave Why some very important military airplanes don't look like military airplanes. read more Read more here:: Opinion: The Rise Of The Special Mission Aircraft… Read more ...

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Bizjets Finding Front-Line Role


Air forces are turning to business jets to meet special mission needs Business jets are becoming the platform of choice for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance. read more Read more here:: Bizjets Finding Front-Line Role… Read more ...

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NBAA to Participate in ICAO Talks on UAS Airspace Integration


Representatives from 25 nations and dozens of aviation groups - including NBAA - will head to Montreal, Canada next month for the fourth meeting of the International Civil Aviation Organization's Panel on Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS). Sarah Wolf, NBAA's senior manager for security and facilitation, will take part in the talks, which are aimed at creating a framework for the operation of unmanned aircraft systems across borders and over international waters. "This panel is full of a number of working groups focused on a variety of issues," said Wolf. "But ultimately, much of our work is aimed at the increasing demands of RPAS operators to fly in non-segregated airspace and at aerodromes." Read more here:: NBAA to Participate in ICAO Talks on UAS Airspace Integration… Read more ...

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Bolen States Opposition to H.R. 4441, Calling It 'Big Airlines' Power Grab'


In testimony before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, NBAA President and CEO Ed Bolen warned of the potentially harmful consequences inherent in the creation a privatized air traffic control system, funded by user fees. Read more here:: Bolen States Opposition to H.R. 4441, Calling It 'Big Airlines' Power Grab'… Read more ...

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New ADS-B transponders from Garmin include iPad option


By John Zimmerman Many pilots may be wondering how there can possibly be another ADS-B product, what with a slew of options from Garmin, L-3, Aspen, Appareo and Freeflight. Isn't the market full? It's certainly... ... Read more here:: New ADS-B transponders from Garmin include iPad option… Read more ...

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UAS Now Allowed in Washington, DC Airspace


The FAA announced it will now allow commercial (and hobbyist) unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) operations in the DC Special Flight Rules Area (SFRA), cancelling prohibitive restrictions previously in place. "This is very welcome news for commercial operators of UAS, which include NBAA members, in and around the DC area," said Bob Lamond, NBAA's director, air traffic services and infrastructure. "The potential for commercial operations in this area is very high, and the decision by the FAA will enable that activity." Lamond noted that The 15 nautical mile flight restricted zone (FRZ) remains in effect. Read more here:: UAS Now Allowed in Washington, DC Airspace… Read more ...

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FAA Urges Airlines to Assess Lithium Battery Risks


February 9- The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) today issued a safety alert to U.S. and foreign commercial passenger and cargo airlines, urging them to conduct a safety risk assessment to manage the risks associated with transporting lithium batteries as cargo. The FAA also is issuing guidance to its own inspectors to help them determine whether the airlines have adequately assessed the risk of handling and carrying lithium batteries as cargo. FAA battery fire testing has highlighted the potential risk of a catastrophic aircraft loss due to damage resulting from a lithium battery fire or explosion. Current cargo fire suppression systems cannot effectively control a lithium battery fire. As a result of those tests, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and aircraft manufacturers Boeing and Airbus have advised airlines about the dangers associated with carrying lithium batteries as cargo and also have encouraged them to conduct safety risk assessments. Hazardous materials rules currently ban passenger airlines from carrying lithium-metal batteries as cargo. In addition, a number of large commercial passenger airlines have decided voluntarily not to carry rechargeable, lithium-ion batteries. The safety risk assessment process is designed to identify and mitigate risks for the airlines that still carry lithium batteries and to help those that don't carry them from inadvertently accepting them for transport. The FAA's Safety Alert For Operators (SAFO) encourages airlines that previously conducted safety assessments to reevaluate them in light of new evidence from the agency's recent lithium battery fire tests. Read more here:: FAA Urges Airlines to Assess Lithium Battery Risks… Read more ...

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